Pattern Matters

Patterned fabrics help bring a breath of fresh air into what can otherwise be a somewhat stilted selection of suit, shirting and printed fabrics.

  • Houndstooth
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    Originated in woven wool cloth of the Scottish Lowlands, The traditional houndstooth check is made with alternating bands of four dark and four light.
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  • Herringbone
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    Also called Broken Twill Weave, a distinctive V-shaped weaving pattern usually found in twill fabric. Resembling the skeleton of a herring fish, a popular design used for suits and outerwear.
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  • Pin Stripe
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    A pattern of thin stripes of any colour running in parallel, associated with conservative business attire, many designers produce the fashionable pinstripe patterns for fashion-conscious consumers.
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  • Chalk Stripe
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    A pattern of thick faded stripes of any colour running in parallel, associated with casual attire, many designers produce the fashionable chalk patterns for fashion-conscious consumers.
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  • Twill
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    Twill is a pattern of diagonal parallel ribs. By passing the weft thread over one or more warp threads and then under two or more warp threads, a “step” or offset between rows is created.
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  • Birds Eye
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    Originating from a Tweel pattern “Scots for Twill” this pattern was used in Country attire. specifically for upper class country-clothing like shooting jackets.
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  • Sharkskin
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    A smooth worsted fabric with a soft texture and a two-toned woven appearance, achieved by basketweaving, creating a pattern in which the coloured threads run diagonal to the white fibers.
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  • Polka Dot
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    Consisting of an array of filled, large in size, circles. It differentiates itself from the spot pattern, as Polka dots are perfectly even and sized.
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  • Paisley
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    A design using the buta or boteh, a droplet-shaped vegetable motif of Iranian decent. The convergence of a stylized floral spray and a cypress tree: a Zoroastrian symbol of life and eternity.
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  • Nailhead
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    A pattern of thick fibres of any colour running in parallel, weaving up and over the weft to create a symmetrical dot checked appearance, a modern design used in contemporary suiting.
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  • Check
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    Displaying bands in two or more colours in woven cloth. Checks are traditionally associated with Scotland where woven dyed wool. The Original Persian word for “Chess” meaning King.
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  • Glen Plaid
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    Short for Glen Urquhart plaid, a woollen fabric with a woven twill design of small and large checks. Nick-named the Prince of Wales check, popularised by the Duke of Windsor when Prince of Wales.
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  • Tartan
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    A criss-crossed weave of horizontal and vertical bands in multiple colours. Adopted as the symbolic national dress of Scotland. Highland tartans associated either regions or districts, not a specific Scottish clan.
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  • Windowplane
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    Another Pattern decending from the scots Tweel collections – found in country wear attire of the 18th Century, this legacy pattern has stood the test of time.
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  • Graphcheck
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    A mathematically pure pattern, made up of vertices, nodes, or points, typically used in cotton shirtings as opposed to any other material.
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  • Gingham
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    Originates from the Malay adjective, genggang, meaning striped. From the mid-18th century, when it was being produced in the mills of Manchester, England, it started to be woven into checked or plaid patterns (often blue and white).
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  • Madras
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    Typically patterned texture and plaid design, used primarily for summer clothing. Generally regarded as belonging to the peasant class in its native India. Dutch traders arrived in India in the early 1600s to trade in the local calico cloth, followed by the British.
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  • Bengal Stripe
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    A modern stripe but with ancient heritage – designed originally to simulate a Bengal Tiger – the meaning of this pattern is strength.
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  • Awning Stripe
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    This sartorial term originated with the red 'blazers' of the Lady Margaret Boat Club (1825), the rowing club of St. John's College, Cambridge. Adapted today for modern shirting made famous by the British Mod movement in the 1960s.
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  • Checked Plaid
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    A variation of the Glen Urquhart plaid, a woollen fabric with a woven twill design of small and large checks.
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  • Hairline Stripe
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    A variation of thin stripes of any colour running in parallel, associated with casual attire, many designers produce the fashionable Hairline patterns for fashion-conscious consumers.
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  • Dogs tooth
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    Also known as a maud, a plaid woven of small black and white checks, AKA Border tartan, Falkirk tartan, Shepherd's check, Shepherd's plaid or Galashiels grey. It was in common use as an item of clothing in the southern counties of Scotland and the northern counties of England until the early twentieth century.
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  • Seersucker
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    A thin, puckered, all-cotton fabric, commonly striped or chequered, originates from the persian words sheer and shakar, literally meaning "milk and sugar", due to the resemblance of its smooth and rough stripes to the smooth texture of milk and the bumpy texture of sugar.
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